People & Markets

  • CS appoints global head of renewables

    CS appoints global head of renewables

    Credit Suisse has promoted Ted Michaels, its head of North America renewables in New York, to a new global position overseeing investment banking in renewables and sustainable energy technology.

  • Politics and Covid fail to dent UK fee pool optimism

    Politics and Covid fail to dent UK fee pool optimism

    Bankers are betting on a strong year for the UK — Europe’s biggest fee pool — but the overlapping concerns of Brexit, Covid-19 and regulation make for an uncertain outlook, writes David Rothnie.

  • Natixis CIB reshuffles management

    Natixis CIB reshuffles management

    A number of top staff at Natixis's corporate and investment banking division have started new jobs, the latest moves in a bout of seat hopping at the top table in this part of the bank.

  • People moves in brief

    People moves in brief

    Loynes extends syndicate responsibilities at Crédit Agricole — CS's equity sales head to join Citi — Flori starts at CEB funding team

  • Wall Street must speak earlier to defend democracy

    Wall Street must speak earlier to defend democracy

    Leading US financial institutions were quick to condemn the shocking attacks on the US Capitol on Wednesday — a sign that they are willing to take positions on important social issues, in line with the industry’s eagerness to align with good environmental, social and governance standards.

  • HSBC's Asia ambitions remain after Enns leaves

    HSBC's Asia ambitions remain after Enns leaves

    HSBC’s aims to boost market share in investment banking and rebalance towards Asia remain intact despite the resignation of one of its most senior lieutenants. But 2021 must be about execution, writes David Rothnie.

  • China moves ahead with delisting reform

    China moves ahead with delisting reform

    The stock exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen have introduced new regulations to forcibly delist companies, fast-tracking the process and giving more clarity about the various scenarios that can push firms to exit the bourses. There are loopholes, however, and the true impact of the regime on China’s equities market will probably be limited, writes Addison Gong.

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