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  • Crunch time coming for Europe’s corporates

    Investment Grade

    Crunch time coming for Europe’s corporates

    Europe’s high grade corporate debt bankers say that early September will be an inflection point in the market. The full effects of the coronavirus pandemic will be on display in corporate earnings and the direction for their investment plans will be clearer.

  • Film director Richard Curtis: ‘the time for tinkering is coming to an end’

    Crisis Talk

    Film director Richard Curtis: ‘the time for tinkering is coming to an end’

    If UK pension savers knew how their money was invested, funds would be more inclined to invest exclusively in environmental, social and governance (ESG) assets. So argues Richard Curtis, the screenwriter, director and co-founder of Comic Relief. He has launched a public campaign, Make My Money Matter, to pressure UK pension funds to invest more sustainably.

  • Ukraine crisis cash in jeopardy after CB chief quits

    CEE

    Ukraine crisis cash in jeopardy after CB chief quits

    The shock resignation of the governor of Ukraine’s central bank on Wednesday night led the sovereign to pull its much-anticipated Eurobond, which had priced just moments before. As investors grow more unsettled, experts fear for the sovereign’s access to institutional funding and capital markets, writes Mariam Meskin.

  • End of GSE conservatorship nears but CFPB ruling raises new questions

    RMBS

    End of GSE conservatorship nears but CFPB ruling raises new questions

    The end of government control of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac drew one step closer this week, but a US Supreme Court ruling on the leadership structure of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) raises the possibility that the course could be reversed under a new government after November's election, write Max Adams and Jennifer Kang.

Keeping tabs

  • Reacting to Wirecard, EM outlook is marred, climate risk is hard

    Reacting to Wirecard, EM outlook is marred, climate risk is hard

    Each week, Keeping Tabs brings you the very best of what we in the GlobalCapital newsroom have found most useful, interesting and informative from around the web. This week: supervising financial reporting, a discordant health and financial picture in emerging markets, and managing climate risk.

  

  

People & Markets

  • ECM are all going on a summer holiday

    ECM are all going on a summer holiday

    After a hectic second quarter, equity capital markets bankers and investor are now hoping for a traditional summer slowdown to allow market participants to take a break.

  • Film director Richard Curtis: ‘the time for tinkering is coming to an end’

    Film director Richard Curtis: ‘the time for tinkering is coming to an end’

    If UK pension savers knew how their money was invested, funds would be more inclined to invest exclusively in environmental, social and governance (ESG) assets. So argues Richard Curtis, the screenwriter, director and co-founder of Comic Relief. He has launched a public campaign, Make My Money Matter, to pressure UK pension funds to invest more sustainably.

  • Hasty UK insolvency law ‘gives with one hand, takes away with the other’

    Hasty UK insolvency law ‘gives with one hand, takes away with the other’

    The biggest reform of UK insolvency law for more than a decade was rushed through Parliament and enacted on June 26, as the coronavirus lockdown is expected to cause a wave of defaults across the economy, reports Jon Hay. The law’s complexity and the haste of its preparation have left restructuring experts chewing over many aspects where they foresee risks of unintended consequences — but also eager to try out some of the law’s new powers.

  • Structured products to remain under scrutiny at French banks

    Structured products to remain under scrutiny at French banks

    Société Générale and Natixis may face more questions over their equity derivatives businesses when they release their second-quarter results. The issue is whether their structured products are inherently problematic or simply suffered from freak events.

  • Critical hedge fund sees better way to do ESG

    Critical hedge fund sees better way to do ESG

    Environmental, social and governance investors have been patting themselves on the back this year because their funds have tended to outperform during the coronavirus crisis. But a San Francisco hedge fund believes they are doing a poor job of shielding investors from the general risk of the stockmarket and more quantitative methods would improve the outcome.

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Leaders

  • Time for SSAs to be more social

    Money market investors are beginning to feel left out of the ESG revolution sweeping capital markets. With the coronavirus pandemic bringing social concerns to the fore, the time is ripe for SSAs to show the kind of leadership they have demonstrated in the bond markets.

  • After a decade, why rush GSE reform now?

    It can hardly be said that the process of releasing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac out of government conservatorship has been rushed. The painstaking process has taken place over the course more than a decade and has consumed the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) through two presidential administrations. And yet, FHFA capital requirements proposals published this week for the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) may not go far enough to ensure their safety and soundness.

  

 

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