The GlobalCapital View

  • Trump sends a message via WeChat. Don’t ignore it.

    Trump sends a message via WeChat. Don’t ignore it.

    US president Donald Trump’s sudden targeting of Tencent Holdings and its flagship app WeChat last week was vague in the extreme. But what is clear is the Trump administration’s increasing willingness to go after China’s tech darlings. That should not be ignored.

  • Luckin Coffee: a crackdown or a sideshow?

    Luckin Coffee: a crackdown or a sideshow?

    China’s hands-on approach into investigating Luckin Coffee signals that the regulators are serious about cracking down on financial crimes by corporations. But the full extent of their commitment will only be revealed by how they tackle similar problems in the future.

  • Supernova: Ant explodes beyond startup limits

    Supernova: Ant explodes beyond startup limits

    Ant Group revealed last week that it is planning a multi-billion-dollar dual listing in Hong Kong and Shanghai. The company is often referred to as a startup, but it will float at a valuation well above $100bn and has been in business for six years. What is the right term for a company like Ant? It is time for a new moniker.

  • Food for thought: Chinese issuers in euros

    Food for thought: Chinese issuers in euros

    Chinese food and beverage company Bright Food’s ability to court investors and push for a tight price for its euro-denominated bond shows the benefits ─ and downsides ─ of an aggressive approach to the euro market.

  • Indian banks have a rough road ahead

    Indian banks have a rough road ahead

    India’s banking sector has long been in trouble. However, while a few banks can appeal to the equity capital markets to restore their capital levels — and their reputations — this won’t be easy or cheap.

  • China bonds: transparency push a clear win

    China bonds: transparency push a clear win

    The Shanghai Clearing House’s decision to give bond issuers insight into the holders of their debt is a smart move. China has enough regulation; what it lacks is information.

  • Renewables need some benign financial engineering

    Renewables need some benign financial engineering

    Clean, green energy exists; it is more or less unlimited and it is increasingly cheap to harvest through solar and wind farms. Why are we not converting to renewables wholesale — especially in poor countries, which tend to have abundant sunshine? A significant part of this market failure is financial, and capital markets must solve it.

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