Brexit could mean end of English law for bonds

A finer point debated in the Brexit negotiations is whether Britain will also leave a European judicial cooperation scheme. That would mean that English law, under which restructurings and bond prospectus terms and conditions are most often written, would not apply to cross-border contracts.

  • By Nell Mackenzie
  • 29 Nov 2017

English law is a firm favourite in the bond market because it is deemed business-friendly in a way many other jurisdictions are not. 

Furthermore, London's status as, arguably, the world's premier international capital market, with so much the historical expertise and infrastructure centred there, as well as English being ...

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All International Bonds

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4 Barclays 25,009.79 63 6.22%
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1 BNP Paribas 299.85 1 21.73%
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Bookrunners of all EMEA ECM Issuance

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2 Credit Suisse 1,301.65 4 18.30%
3 UBS 970.80 3 13.65%
4 BNP Paribas 522.35 4 7.34%
5 SG Corporate & Investment Banking 444.17 3 6.24%