U.K. Inflation Swaps Mart Stumbles On IAS 39

The U.K. inflation swaps market may face a shortage of counterparties willing to pay inflation because corporates operating under International Accounting Standards are concerned the instruments will add volatility to their accounts.

  • 21 Jan 2005
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The U.K. inflation swaps market may face a shortage of counterparties willing to pay inflation because corporates operating under International Accounting Standards are concerned the instruments will add volatility to their accounts. Alan James, inflation-linked strategist at Barclays Capital in London, noted, "This will reduce the growth of the swaps market."

In the U.K., corporates have entered inflation swaps to mirror revenue streams that are either correlated to inflation, in the case of retailers, or directly linked, in the case of utilities. Many of these issued bonds and separately entered inflation swaps because it offered a lower cost of funding than issuing an inflation linked bond. Under IAS 39, however, corporates looking to manage inflation risk by entering inflation swaps on conventional bonds will not qualify for hedge accounting. This rule change is likely to have the largest impact on the sterling inflation swaps market because it is the most developed.

U.K. grocer J Sainsbury uses inflation swaps, but Simon Gibson, assistant treasurer in London, said if this issue is still hanging over the market when it needs to enter another swap it would not execute the trade. Joe O'Neill, group treasurer at AMEC in London, said the corporate has looked at inflation swaps for both its pension fund and as a treasury instrument, but has not executed any trades because of the adverse accounting treatment.

Gibson said Sainsbury will look at alternative methods of hedging inflation, but he noted it would have to be approved by its audit company.

James said the U.K. inflation swaps market may only be temporarily unbalanced. "The demand side is really driving growth," he added, explaining non-listed entities could help inflation supply. One corporate sales official, however, said he had already seen a drop off in inflation swaps by corporates. "It's a thorny issue and it's not immediately obvious how we will get around this," he added.

  • 21 Jan 2005

All International Bonds

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 13 Mar 2017
1 JPMorgan 94,925.33 384 8.39%
2 Citi 87,531.58 331 7.74%
3 Bank of America Merrill Lynch 84,341.49 288 7.46%
4 Barclays 75,288.19 241 6.66%
5 Goldman Sachs 68,504.71 208 6.06%

Bookrunners of All Syndicated Loans EMEA

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 16 May 2017
1 Deutsche Bank 19,381.65 47 8.82%
2 Bank of America Merrill Lynch 18,968.25 36 8.63%
3 HSBC 18,103.95 50 8.24%
4 BNP Paribas 8,911.57 55 4.05%
5 SG Corporate & Investment Banking 8,885.00 54 4.04%

Bookrunners of all EMEA ECM Issuance

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 16 May 2017
1 JPMorgan 8,369.56 33 8.53%
2 UBS 8,282.28 33 8.44%
3 Citi 6,605.58 44 6.74%
4 Goldman Sachs 6,444.85 31 6.57%
5 Bank of America Merrill Lynch 6,215.31 24 6.34%