Asset bubble highly unlikely, StandChart's Feder says

In an exclusive submission to asiamoney.com, Lenny Feder, group head of financial markets at Standard Chartered, discusses the odds of an asset bubble forming in Asia.

  • 15 Nov 2010
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The US Federal Reserve has been pumping money into the financial system at terminal velocity in a desperate bid to boost the economy. The various bouts of quantitative easing in the US, the latest of which is seen in ‘quantitative easing 2’ (QE2), comprising US$600 billion of stimulus money, has ignited worries about the side effects of the formation of asset bubbles in Asia—as seen in the rise of price inflation in stock markets and residential properties.

Our Asia-centric view is that the big issue is not about QE2 or asset bubbles. The almost one-way flow of liquidity to Asia reflects a fundamental shift in the allocation of global fund managers’ portfolios.

Even before QE2 talks the inflows into Asia and emerging markets had picked up speed. Three percent of US pension funds are invested in Asia while this region makes up 30% of nominal global GDP. So there is massive underinvestment in the region and hence room for further growth and little risk of overheating.

The term asset bubble implies an anomaly, and it gives the impression that things could ‘pop’ any time. We think otherwise. The shift of wealth to Asia will continue to build over the next decade, and in the long run the region has the capacity to absorb all the liquidity coming its way.

Look around the globe and it’s clear that Asia is where investors should be putting their money. However, regulators are understandably cautious about absorbing too much liquidity all at once, and are taking appropriate steps to temper the flows to a more manageable pace.

The shift of relative value to Asia versus the rest of the world will continue, and Asian regulators need to manage that process wisely, which is what they have been doing to the right degree.

  • 15 Nov 2010

Bookrunners of International Emerging Market DCM

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 25 Apr 2016
1 HSBC 14,332.20 71 10.96%
2 Citi 14,256.99 61 10.90%
3 JPMorgan 12,784.18 45 9.78%
4 Deutsche Bank 8,341.54 24 6.38%
5 Bank of America Merrill Lynch 7,599.48 32 5.81%

Bookrunners of LatAm Emerging Market DCM

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 26 Apr 2016
1 JPMorgan 7,001.66 10 15.44%
2 HSBC 5,431.62 10 11.98%
3 Citi 5,039.39 9 11.11%
4 BBVA 4,995.02 7 11.01%
5 Santander 4,406.15 6 9.72%

Bookrunners of CEEMEA International Bonds

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 26 Apr 2016
1 Citi 6,816.39 25 19.45%
2 JPMorgan 4,096.61 16 11.69%
3 Bank of America Merrill Lynch 2,654.29 7 7.57%
4 Barclays 2,538.43 11 7.24%
5 UniCredit 2,334.02 10 6.66%

EMEA M&A Revenue

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 25 Apr 2016
1 JPMorgan 194.46 49 10.82%
2 Goldman Sachs 161.74 36 9.00%
3 Morgan Stanley 136.96 43 7.62%
4 Bank of America Merrill Lynch 112.36 32 6.25%
5 Citi 92.61 34 5.16%

Bookrunners of Central and Eastern Europe: Loans

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 26 Apr 2016
1 SG Corporate & Investment Banking 1,494.37 6 16.14%
2 UniCredit 945.06 6 10.21%
3 Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group 892.90 3 9.64%
4 ING 868.18 5 9.38%
5 Citi 817.33 5 8.83%

Bookrunners of India DCM

Rank Lead Manager Amount $m No of issues Share %
  • Last updated
  • 27 Apr 2016
1 AXIS Bank 1,029.54 33 15.14%
2 Trust Investment Advisors 716.42 40 10.54%
3 Standard Chartered Bank 708.61 8 10.42%
4 HDFC Bank 572.45 22 8.42%
5 HSBC 549.36 7 8.08%